Blog

Apr 02, 2015
Simulating Sprawl: What Economists Can Learn from ABMs

by MELISSA ANDREYCHEK
Communications Coordinator

Mainstream economics has yet to embrace the potential of agent-based modeling to accelerate our understanding of how humans impact systems. But evidence that this tool is useful for exploring environmental-economic problems is easy to find.

Nicholas Magliocca, a... Read more...

Mar 25, 2015
Replumbing Cities from Gray to Green

by PAUL LAGASSE
Guest Contributor

As we go about our day, most of us never stop to think about the steady flows of fresh and waste waters that happen every moment just a few feet beneath the sidewalks and streets. Kristina Hopkins, postdoctoral fellow at the National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center... Read more...

Mar 11, 2015
Agricultural Terracing: Steps to Conservation

by PAUL LAGASSE
Guest Contributor

For the last several thousand years, humans have used agricultural terracing—the leveling of sloped land into “steps” that serve as planting beds—as a means to grow food where flat land is hard to find. Today, scientists believe that those same techniques can be adapted to help agricultural... Read more...

Mar 04, 2015
Q&A with Dr. Andres Baeza: This is Why We Cooperate

by MELISSA ANDREYCHEK
Communications Coordinator

To compete or to cooperate? That is the question.

In arid regions, where communities are threatened by drastic and unpredictable environmental changes, water scarcity should pit farmer against farmer. But in the semi-desert area that lies between the Atacama Desert... Read more...

Feb 03, 2015
Connecting the Dots in Policy Networks

by MELISSA ANDREYCHEK
Communications Coordinator

The San Joaquin–Sacramento River Delta presents a classic example of governance conflict. More than 23 million Californians and millions of acres of farmland rely on the Delta for all or part of their water supply. Countless species depend on it for their habitat. Individuals and organizations, both public and private, represent a dizzying array of interests and interdependencies—and they make... Read more...

Jan 22, 2015
Engineering Change: Reflections on Restoration

by MELISSA ANDREYCHEK
Communications Coordinator

At first glance, the intent of ecological restoration may appear obvious: repair some of the damage humans have done to ecosystems and biodiversity. But a closer look reveals the complexity inherent in designing and carrying out a restoration plan—activities that necessarily engage a wide diversity of scientific, legislative, regulatory, and planning expertise.

Many of the world’s ecosystems... Read more...

Jan 13, 2015
What We're Reading

"The scientific mind does not so much provide the right answers as ask the right questions."

— Claude Lévi-Strauss, anthropologist and ethnologist

   
Reading... Read more...

Dec 12, 2014
Protecting Marine Areas from Across Oceans

WWF International, Gland, Switzerland
Photo courtesy David Gill

Billions of people around the world  rely on fish and other marine resources for food and income. However, the health of our oceans and waterways is under threat from human activities—and those in developing countries, many of whom depend upon these resources as... Read more...

Nov 26, 2014
Understanding Human–Tiger Conflicts from Nepal

Image courtesy Neil Carter

by MELISSA ANDREYCHEK
Communications Coordinator

If you ask a conservationist, tigers are dangerously close to joining a disadvantageous list that includes the moa, dodo, blue antelope, and Atlas bear.

Tigers are at risk of extinction. In the past century,... Read more...

Nov 25, 2014
Can Ecologists & Engineers Work Together to Harness Water For The Future?

by LISA PALMER
Guest Blogger

The Pangani River in Tanzania is important for many reasons: its three major dams provide 17 percent of the country’s electricity; it sustains thousands of farmers and herders living in the basin; and its flow of fresh water supports humans, industry, and ecosystems. But most interesting might be the innovative water policies that govern withdrawals, infrastructure projects, and ecosystems along its banks.

... Read more...

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