News

Nov 27, 2019
New modeling will shed light on the ways policy decisions affect migration from sea level rise

A new modeling approach can help researchers, policymakers, and the public better understand how policy decisions will influence human migration as sea levels rise around the globe, a new paper published in Nature Climate Change suggests. These findings emerged from an interdisciplinary working group supported by the University of Maryland’s National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center (SESYNC) with funding from the National Science Foundation.


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Nov 25, 2019
Making the Case for Qualitative Data

Former SESYNC postdoctoral fellow Steven Alexander and former SESYNC Assistant Research Scientist Kristal Jones authored the article, “Qualitative data sharing and synthesis for sustainability science" following a Qualitative Data Sharing Workshop that they led. 


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Nov 25, 2019
A Framework for Managing Stormwater through the Use of Green Infrastructure

SESYNC Postdoctoral Fellow Steven Alexander and Philip Staniczenko's article "Social ties explain catch portfolios of small-scale fishers in the Caribbean" was recently published in Fish and Fisheries.

 


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Nov 22, 2019
Understanding Variation in Yard Care Practices to Mitigate Environmental Impacts

Former SESYNC postdoctoral fellow Dexter H. Locke led is lead author on the resulting article, titled “Residential household yard care practices along urban-exurban gradients in six climactically-diverse U.S. metropolitan areas,” which was recently published in PLOS ONE


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Nov 08, 2019
Academics in Canoes Getting Coffee

 Former SESYNC Postdoctoral Fellow Phillip P.A. Staniczenko reflects on a recent interdisciplinary collaboration in a Q&A. 

 

 


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Nov 01, 2019
The Story of Urban Water Management Transitions

A Graduate Pursuit focused on urban water management improved theoretical understandings of urban management and policy transitions.


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Nov 01, 2019
How Social Ties Can Accelerate Sustainable Fishing

Former SESYNC Postdoctoral Fellows Steven Alexander and Philip Staniczenko's article "Social ties explain catch portfolios of small-scale fishers in the Caribbean" was recently published in Fish and Fisheries.

 


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Oct 28, 2019
Modern Insights into Plagues of Old

In his recent seminar at the National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center (SESYNC), historical epidemiologist, Professor Tim Newfield explained how he uses collaborative and interdisciplinary approaches to bring new evidence into discussions of the deep past (1st millennium CE) and the Antonine Plague.

 

 


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Oct 10, 2019
SESYNC Expands Synthesis and Leadership Opportunities for Graduate Students with New Workshop

To address the need for expanded synthesis opportunities for graduate students, SESYNC is developing a set of graduate workshops that will further build students’ capacity for interdisciplinary and socio-environmental science and teach them the skills needed to lead an interdisciplinary team. 


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Oct 10, 2019
SESYNC in The New York Times: SESYNC researchers discuss soils and saltwater intrusion in “As Sea Levels Rise, So Do Ghost Forests”


A planning workshop at SESYNC helped inform Kate Tully’s and Keryn Gedan’s research on sea-level rise and ghost forests, recently featured in the
New York Times.

Up and down the mid-Atlantic coast, sea levels are rising rapidly, creating stands of dead trees — often bleached, sometimes blackened — known as ghost forests.

The water is gaining as much as 5 millimeters per year in some places, well above the global average of 3.1 millimeters, driven by profound environmental shifts that include climate change.

A ghost forest
Photo: The New York Times

Increasingly powerful storms, a consequence of a warming world, push seawater inland. More intense dry spells reduce freshwater flowing outward. Adding to the peril, in some places the land is naturally sinking.

All of this allows seawater to claim new territory, killing trees from the roots up.

Rising seas often conjure the threat to faraway, low-lying nations or island-states. But to understand the immediate consequences of some of the most rapid sea-level rise anywhere in the world, stand among the scraggly, dying pines of Dorchester County along the Maryland coast.

People living on the eastern shore of Chesapeake Bay, the country’s largest estuary system, have a front-row view of the sea’s rapid advance, said Keryn Gedan, a wetland ecologist at George Washington University.

Continue reading at The New York Times.

 

 


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